Yard Sale or Estate Sale?

You probably know what a yard sale (or garage sale) is. Maybe you see them all the time, either advertised in the paper or while driving by. The desired result is to purge your household of clutter and pick up a few dollars in the process.

planning an estate sale.jpg

 

Holding a yard sale is different than planning an estate sale. A yard sale involves gathering all those possessions you feel like you can live without — clothes, kitchen utensils, toys, tools, books, movies, etc. — and putting them up for sale in front of your house, apartment or church. An estate sale is much more involved and targets a slightly different customer.

The Estate Sale Process

An estate sale isn’t selling off those things you don’t need; it’s an exclusive and specific type of sale, often to sell an entire life’s worth of possessions. The possessions may be yours, a parent’s or another relative’s. There are two main steps for planning an estate sale:

  1. Finding a professional to help you organize and run the sale

  2. Choosing which items to keep and which to sell

Neither step is easy because you don’t have a reason for planning an estate sale unless something significant happens, such as a:

  • Loss of a loved one
  • Foreclosure
  • Significant downsizing

Since these can all be difficult, emotional times even without planning an estate sale, you need the help of a professional like us here at the Art of Downsizing in Western North Carolina. Finding yourself responsible for taking care of a loved one’s possessions can be overwhelming. Knowing that experienced professionals are respectfully handling the estate can be a source of comfort and solace.

Maintain Your Peace of Mind

Planning an estate sale is always a delicate enterprise. Selecting the items to sell is a process wrought with emotion. We understand how family treasures often have higher emotional value than monetary value, no matter how expensive they are. We assist you, providing clear choices when it seems overwhelming and reminding you what’s feasible to keep and what isn’t.

Due to the usually high quality and unique nature of the items available at an estate sale and  organization, expect prices to run higher than your average yard sale. Estate sales are filled with the types of things collected over the course of a lifetime. And it’s not unusual for antiques, fine china, and one-of-a-kind collectables to be presented in an estate sale.

Art of the Sale

An estate sale usually runs for two to three days, often over a weekend. And since estate sales are generally more formal events, whether held in person or online, buyers come already knowing what to expect. When you let an experienced professional take responsibility for planning an estate sale, we do all the work to organize and advertise the sale, while you reap all the benefits. And because we can help you sort through the items, you feel supported during the entire process.

Dealing with seasoned professionals can make your estate sale much less stressful than attempting to confront the haggling public at a yard sale. Think of this way: the difference between a yard sale and an estate sale is the difference between selling off some extra things and having your family's belongings carefully inventoried, researched and staged to bring in quality buyers that are willing to pay higher prices.

 

Yard Sale or Estate Sale?

You probably know what a yard sale (or garage sale) is. Maybe you see them all the time, either advertised in the paper or while driving by. The desired result is to purge your household of clutter and pick up a few dollars in the process.

planning an estate sale.jpg

 

Holding a yard sale is different than planning an estate sale. A yard sale involves gathering all those possessions you feel like you can live without — clothes, kitchen utensils, toys, tools, books, movies, etc. — and putting them up for sale in front of your house, apartment or church. An estate sale is much more involved and targets a slightly different customer.

The Estate Sale Process

An estate sale isn’t selling off those things you don’t need; it’s an exclusive and specific type of sale, often to sell an entire life’s worth of possessions. The possessions may be yours, a parent’s or another relative’s. There are two main steps for planning an estate sale:

  1. Finding a professional to help you organize and run the sale

  2. Choosing which items to keep and which to sell

Neither step is easy because you don’t have a reason for planning an estate sale unless something significant happens, such as a:

  • Loss of a loved one
  • Foreclosure
  • Significant downsizing

Since these can all be difficult, emotional times even without planning an estate sale, you need the help of a professional like us here at the Art of Downsizing in Western North Carolina. Finding yourself responsible for taking care of a loved one’s possessions can be overwhelming. Knowing that experienced professionals are respectfully handling the estate can be a source of comfort and solace.

Maintain Your Peace of Mind

Planning an estate sale is always a delicate enterprise. Selecting the items to sell is a process wrought with emotion. We understand how family treasures often have higher emotional value than monetary value, no matter how expensive they are. We assist you, providing clear choices when it seems overwhelming and reminding you what’s feasible to keep and what isn’t.

Due to the usually high quality and unique nature of the items available at an estate sale and  organization, expect prices to run higher than your average yard sale. Estate sales are filled with the types of things collected over the course of a lifetime. And it’s not unusual for antiques, fine china, and one-of-a-kind collectables to be presented in an estate sale.

Art of the Sale

An estate sale usually runs for two to three days, often over a weekend. And since estate sales are generally more formal events, whether held in person or online, buyers come already knowing what to expect. When you let an experienced professional take responsibility for planning an estate sale, we do all the work to organize and advertise the sale, while you reap all the benefits. And because we can help you sort through the items, you feel supported during the entire process.

Dealing with seasoned professionals can make your estate sale much less stressful than attempting to confront the haggling public at a yard sale. Think of this way: the difference between a yard sale and an estate sale is the difference between selling off some extra things and having your family's belongings carefully inventoried, researched and staged to bring in quality buyers that are willing to pay higher prices.

 

Trust and Ethics

Are you or your parents not sure how to handle upcoming changes in your living situations? You aren’t alone. If you’re a baby boomer — an adult born between 1946 and 1964 — you may find yourself caring for aging parents or their estates after they pass. You may even consider reducing your own material footprint. After all, do you want your children to go through what you’re experiencing now?

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Turn to a professional to help deal with all the material possessions. Perhaps holding an estate sale is a viable solution for you. Just be careful; you don’t need the added stress of dealing with disreputable providers for your estate sale. You deserve to work with someone who values and honors your feelings and your emotional ties to the belongings.

When You Need an Estate Sale

Holding an estate sale usually entails so much more than just appraising and liquidating material possessions. At the Art of Downsizing, we understand that emotions and memories are intricately linked to your treasures and collections. When you’re going through these stirring emotional times, you need trustworthy liquidators — professionals who operate with the utmost integrity.

The task of holding an estate sale can be daunting, especially when you’re hit with the process during a crisis:

  • Your mother, who’d been happily living alone, suddenly needs to go into an assisted living facility.

  • Your dad passes after a long illness, and it falls to you to clean out his condo.

  • Your adult children are moving, and you want to follow to remain close to your grandkids.

In cases like these, your stress levels may be stretched tight. Anyone who comes to your rescue with the promise of helping you downsize and of holding an estate sale to sort out your things may seem like an angel. But don’t believe everything you hear.

Buyer Beware

Never is it more prudent to check out the credentials and trustworthiness of a professional as it is when the task ahead is rife with emotional baggage. According to the American Society of Estate Liquidators,® the estate sale industry is attracting more and more disreputable vendors than ever before. And these hustlers don’t care about you, but are “only in it for the income.”

With so many newcomers in the field, it’s more important than ever to look for reputable professionals when holding an estate sale — people who know the pitfalls associated with estate sales, who care about the outcomes and who’ve built a solid reputation for honesty and integrity. Look for an estate sales company that walks its talk, for whom ethics are not just a list of words on their website.

Tips for Finding an Ethical Team for Holding an Estate Sale

Before you fall victim to a quick, fly-by-night estate operation, consider these tips so that you can rest easy and find peace and closure with an ethical, trustworthy estate sale team:

  • Ask for and call referrals from friends, family and church members. Ask trusted professionals such as attorneys, Realtors and financial advisors.
  • Expect prompt responses to your inquiries, meaning timely returned phone calls and emails, as well as quick answers to your questions.
  • Follow your intuition; if something doesn’t sit right with you, listen to your gut and call someone else.
  • Watch how the estate sales professional speaks, dresses and carries herself.
  • Find out if she’s really listening to you by asking for a follow-up report on your first meeting.
  • Check out the estate sale company’s ability to price your items appropriately by asking for some on-the-spot estimates.
  • Search online for reviews.
  • Look for association memberships, which often require a commitment to high standards and industry-recognized ethics.

The Cost of Too Much Stuff

Hello, Downsizers! Have you ever felt that the pain of holding on has become stronger than the pain of letting go? It happens to all of us at some point. And it’s a sign that you may need to let some or all of your wonderful accumulations go. You may be ready for the benefits of decluttering.

the cost of too much stuff.jpg

You’re probably reading this because you recognize the burden of too much stuff — from family heirlooms to collectables and memorabilia. It all takes up too much space in your home, your heart and your wallet. When the benefits of decluttering outweigh the benefits of storing, it’s time to reconsider your options.

Keeping material possessions and physical memories all in one place may be beginning to look more like disarray than a lifetime of love. Your life may change from year to year, but your things continue to pile up. If you’re spending your most precious resource — time — cleaning, finding lost items or moving your memories from place to place, consider:

The Actual Costs of Too Much Stuff

Time is money, for sure. But let’s leave that out of the equation for now. The monetary — and emotional — expense of keeping everything still piles up. Some costs are obvious, but others may lurk under your radar:

  • If you use your garage for storage, your car accumulates more wear and tear from leaving it out in the elements, even if you live in a moderate climate like Asheville’s.
  • If you rent a storage unit, even a very small one could cost you close to $700 per year. A large unit can run as high as $2,500.
  • If you rely on a spare bedroom for storage, you may have to pay for hotel rooms when family and friends come to visit. Or you could squeeze them in between the unopened boxes and bags of things you know you need to go through.
  • If you trip over the mounting mementos, you could face a rather embarrassing hospital bill. Meanwhile, the dust and mold that accumulates can lead to mounting medical costs when allergies kick in.
  • Even if you don’t consider yourself a hoarder, you can reap the benefits of decluttering. Too many things can have costly consequences. And while you consider the costs of your own collections, talk to your aging parents or struggling siblings. Chances are this is a generational habit, so take the lead in tackling these issues together.

The Benefits of Decluttering

Take advantage of the numerous benefits of simplifying your space. Positive outcomes you’ll notice immediately include:

  • Reduced stress
  • Sense of peacefulness
  • Room to breathe
  • Easier cleaning
  • Space to maneuver around your home and find the things you’re looking for
  • $avings and rewards, because you can cash in on items you know you can let go of

As you probably know, starting is often the hardest part, but the benefits of decluttering await you. To get a sense of clarity about which possessions are important for you and your family and which ones you can let go, ask for help. Allow the team at the Art of Downsizing to help you begin that freeing journey to rid your home of too much stuff. You don’t have to give it away; let it create new memories for others.

The Cost of Too Much Stuff

Hello, Downsizers! Have you ever felt that the pain of holding on has become stronger than the pain of letting go? It happens to all of us at some point. And it’s a sign that you may need to let some or all of your wonderful accumulations go. You may be ready for the benefits of decluttering.

the cost of too much stuff.jpg

You’re probably reading this because you recognize the burden of too much stuff — from family heirlooms to collectables and memorabilia. It all takes up too much space in your home, your heart and your wallet. When the benefits of decluttering outweigh the benefits of storing, it’s time to reconsider your options.

Keeping material possessions and physical memories all in one place may be beginning to look more like disarray than a lifetime of love. Your life may change from year to year, but your things continue to pile up. If you’re spending your most precious resource — time — cleaning, finding lost items or moving your memories from place to place, consider:

The Actual Costs of Too Much Stuff

Time is money, for sure. But let’s leave that out of the equation for now. The monetary — and emotional — expense of keeping everything still piles up. Some costs are obvious, but others may lurk under your radar:

  • If you use your garage for storage, your car accumulates more wear and tear from leaving it out in the elements, even if you live in a moderate climate like Asheville’s.
  • If you rent a storage unit, even a very small one could cost you close to $700 per year. A large unit can run as high as $2,500.
  • If you rely on a spare bedroom for storage, you may have to pay for hotel rooms when family and friends come to visit. Or you could squeeze them in between the unopened boxes and bags of things you know you need to go through.
  • If you trip over the mounting mementos, you could face a rather embarrassing hospital bill. Meanwhile, the dust and mold that accumulates can lead to mounting medical costs when allergies kick in.
  • Even if you don’t consider yourself a hoarder, you can reap the benefits of decluttering. Too many things can have costly consequences. And while you consider the costs of your own collections, talk to your aging parents or struggling siblings. Chances are this is a generational habit, so take the lead in tackling these issues together.

The Benefits of Decluttering

Take advantage of the numerous benefits of simplifying your space. Positive outcomes you’ll notice immediately include:

  • Reduced stress
  • Sense of peacefulness
  • Room to breathe
  • Easier cleaning
  • Space to maneuver around your home and find the things you’re looking for
  • $avings and rewards, because you can cash in on items you know you can let go of

As you probably know, starting is often the hardest part, but the benefits of decluttering await you. To get a sense of clarity about which possessions are important for you and your family and which ones you can let go, ask for help. Allow the team at the Art of Downsizing to help you begin that freeing journey to rid your home of too much stuff. You don’t have to give it away; let it create new memories for others.